Letter of rejecting a business proposal

GUIDELINES

  1. Express with the regret the rejection.
  2. Explain to the reader the grounds of rejection in all fairness.
  3. Let the reader know that he will be considered in the future, if appropriate.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I regret to inform you that we cannot go ahead with your business proposal.

You should know that we'd requested multiple suppliers to send in their bids so as to get the best quotation along with top notch quality. Another supplier has managed to provide us with a competitive proposal.

Nevertheless, we will approach you the next time we are looking at bids for a similar project. Thank you.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter of rejecting a business proposal.

Further things to consider when writing inform letters to business partners

Further things to consider when writing inform letters to business partners

Inform Letters

Inform letters are letters written to communicate new knowledge or changes in situations. Whether you want to keep your employees updated with recent changes in the work routine or structure of the company, or to communicate interview dates to job applicants, an inform letter will be the best formal way to do it. Inform letters can also be used to inform employees about new policies that may affect the employment's terms and conditions as agreed to in the contract. For instance, if workdays and business hours are planned during a holiday, an employee should send inform letters to communicate the new schedule and ask employees to solicit cooperation.

Keeping your employees well informed is important to your business and inform letters are powerful tools to do just that. Mention the reason for writing early in the letter. Be thorough, concise, and omit irrelevant details. For unpleasant news like a layoff, be direct yet sensitive. Give clear and complete information to avoid being bombarded with questions later. Communicate exactly what you want the recipient to do. End the letter on a positive note and send it early enough so that the reader has enough time to prepare for the assignment.

Letters to Business Partners

Letters to business partners are letters you write to people with whom you have some degree of involvement with their business dealings. A business partnership is a legal relationship formed when two or more people agree to run a business together are co-owners. When you make such a partnership, you need to write a letter to your business partners to convey your message clearly and strongly, and to keep a legal record of the partnership. The letter should be formal and must contain the partnership offer, names of all the business partners, and the terms and conditions of the partnership.

Letters to business partners should be written with a professional tone. They should conform to all the accepted business letters standards. State the purpose of the letter. Give all the necessary details regarding the partnership as outlined in the contract. Include the name and title of the recipient. Employ the appropriate formal salutations and closings. State the date clearly and mention any document that is enclosed with the letter. Close the letter on a positive note and sign it off with your name and title. Letters to business partners should be printed on the company's letterhead.

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