Letter of introduction

GUIDELINES

  1. Introduce yourself with a unique selling proposition to catch the readers attention.
  2. State your qualifications, experience and hobbies.
  3. Be willing to provide more information, if needed.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

Have you wanted someone reliable who takes his responsibility seriously? If so, I am glad to introduce myself. My name is John Smith.

I am a graduate with bachelor's in Business Management. I have worked for seven years in an accounting firm, XYZ Ltd. as the account head. I am an experienced adventure trainer and as a hobby, I enjoy scuba diving.

If there is anything more you would like to know about me, please write back to me or we could meet. I will wait to hear from you.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter of introduction.

Further things to consider when writing introduction letters to whom it may concern

Further things to consider when writing introduction letters to whom it may concern

Introduction Letters

Introduction letters are letters written to establish contact, outline new products or services or request information. Such letters are used in business communications. They can be to introduce a connection to people you already know or to people you have never met. The primary objective of introduction letters is to introduce yourself, your business, or another person to another party. In any scenario, introduction letters should be readable, concise, and effective in delivering the information you want. Introduction letters are a great networking tool and an effective way to get what you want from people you have not met physically.

One of the most important tips to remember when writing introduction letters is to keep them brief and to the point. First, state who you are and your role, and where necessary, mention how you got the recipient's name. Then, briefly explain the purpose of your letter and what you hope to accomplish - be as clear as you can. Include any other details that you think could be helpful. Establish a personal connection and an appropriate tone of the letter. Conclude with a brief description of how the recipient can get in touch with you.

Letters to Whom It May Concern

Letters to whom it may concern are letters addressed to unknown recipients. The term "To whom it may concern" is, basically, a letter salutation that has been used over the years in business correspondence when a sender doesn't have a specific recipient or doesn't know the name of the recipient. This may happen many times during your job search. For instance, you may be sending a recommendation letter, cover letter or any other job application material to someone you don't know. It is also appropriate to address a letter to whom it may concern if you're making an inquiry but don't know who to address your letter to.

Although sending letters to whom it may concern has been a common practice, other options such as, "To hiring manager", "To customer service manager", etc., can be used at the start of a letter. Of course, you should make an effort to find the recipient's name. You can look it up on the recipient's company website, LinkedIn or other professional social sites, or contact the office and ask the assistant for advice. However, when this is not possible, you can still use "To whom it may concern".

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