Letter announcing a new employee. Sample letter

GUIDELINES

  1. Introduce the new employee.
  2. Put down the position to be filled and the date wherein the change will take place.
  3. If it is needed, you can include a bit of the new employees background and skills but be brief and concise.
  4. Ask the existing employees to welcome the newcomer.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

To All:

Effective March 15, 2009, we will have Mr. Edward James join our company as our new Marketing Manager.

He specializes in (put down the particular fields and skills which are pertinent)

Please join me in welcoming him to our esteemed company.

Carter BlackHuman Resource Manager

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter announcing a new employee. Sample letter.

Further things to consider when writing announcement letters to whom it may concern

Further things to consider when writing announcement letters to whom it may concern

Announcement Letters

Announcement letters are letters that notify or give information about a certain occasion, special event, or occurrence that people are required to be aware of. They could be for a concert, a special sale, or even a graduation party. Announcement letters are usually informal and state clearly and concisely what the event/occasion is and what further actions the recipient should take. Announcement letters can be used in many personal and business situations. In personal situations these letters may be used, for instance, to announce a birthday, death, wedding, or graduation. In the business world, such letters may be used to announce a new policy, change in management, financial summaries for investors, grand sale, or actions against a customer due to nonpayment.

Announcement letters should be written in a straightforward manner stating all the necessary facts. Clearly state why you feel the occasion is important. If you are delivering bad news, be optimistic for the future. Bold and highlight the points that need focus so that the content is clear to the reader. Add any information which you think your reader might want to know and do not miss out any important detail. End the letter on a positive note.

Letters to Whom It May Concern

Letters to whom it may concern are letters addressed to unknown recipients. The term "To whom it may concern" is, basically, a letter salutation that has been used over the years in business correspondence when a sender doesn't have a specific recipient or doesn't know the name of the recipient. This may happen many times during your job search. For instance, you may be sending a recommendation letter, cover letter or any other job application material to someone you don't know. It is also appropriate to address a letter to whom it may concern if you're making an inquiry but don't know who to address your letter to.

Although sending letters to whom it may concern has been a common practice, other options such as, "To hiring manager", "To customer service manager", etc., can be used at the start of a letter. Of course, you should make an effort to find the recipient's name. You can look it up on the recipient's company website, LinkedIn or other professional social sites, or contact the office and ask the assistant for advice. However, when this is not possible, you can still use "To whom it may concern".

These articles may interest you

These articles may interest you