Letter appreciating an employee's idea to start a new system

GUIDELINES

  1. If you receive a suggestion, give a positive response if you plan to implement it. Don't just acknowledge the proposal, notify the reader that you are going to put it in place. Maintain an active and complementary tone.
  2. Appreciate the reader's suggestion.
  3. Explain how you will implement the proposal.
  4. State what benefits will come out of this action.
  5. End by acknowledging the reader.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I would like to notify you of how much we appreciate your suggestions to begin incorporation of an electronic ed scheduling system. We have discussed your proposal at the last meeting of staff that we held, and have decided to implement it as of next month. Without a doubt, such a system will save our company significant money and time. Please keep up the good work. Fraser Corporation based its success on the thoughtfulness of employees such as you.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter appreciating an employee's idea to start a new system.

Further things to consider when writing acceptance letters to employees

Further things to consider when writing acceptance letters to employees

Acceptance Letters

Acceptance letters are a form of written communication exercised by people to accept a proposal or request formally. The purpose of these letters is to acknowledge your acceptance of the request at hand or express your readiness to do something. The simple act of replying in writing demonstrates a bright side of your character to those inviting. Some of the situations you might want to reply with an acceptance letter include admission requests, franchising opportunities and invite to meetings or celebrations. Proposals, job opportunities, privy membership invites, or speaking engagements may also require you to write an acceptance letter.

When writing acceptance letters, you should thank the person at the beginning of the letter and state how happy you are about accepting the proposal. Be sure to write the exact title of the proposal. Mention any needs, to your situation, for example, address and directions to the venue or agreed amount for charitable donations. If you are accepting an employment offer, restate the terms to show the other person you clearly understand them. Keep the letters as brief as possible and straight to the point. Where appropriate, inform the other person what is going to happen next.

Letters to Employees

Letters to employees are letters written to individuals who work for an organization or for another person. If you are an employer or manage a group of employees, the chances are that you will have to write to the employees at some point. It could be an introduction letter to introduce a new product or service to salespersons, a rejection letter to turn down an employee's request for a promotion, or a thank-you letter to thank an employee for his/her hard work. You could also write a termination letter to fire an employee for his/her poor performance. Whatever the reason for your writing, the letter must be formal and professional.

All letters to employees must be addressed with the proper names of the recipients. But if your message is intended for all employees in general, you can address your letter as "To all employees". State the purpose of the letter. Convey your message briefly but clearly, highlighting all the important details. If the issue that you are writing about requires further explanation, make sure to offer your explanation in a way that the recipient can easily understand. Wrap it up with a positive note or a call to action.

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