Letter to remind an organization member to pay the annual fee

GUIDELINES

  1. When asking for payment, get straight to the point. However, make sure that the message should be respectful, yet short.
  2. Remind the member that the deadline for payment is nearly due, and he or she needs to pay it. Tell him or her the exact amount that he/she needs to pay.
  3. Instruct the member the steps in making the payment.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

We would like to remind you that it is time to pay our annual membership fees. Due to the unexpected expenses that we made for the remodeling of our Club House, our fees will be a bit higher than they were last year. Enclosed is your membership statement. Please send us a check in the enclosed envelope on or before June 5. Thank you.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter to remind an organization member to pay the annual fee.

Further things to consider when writing follow-up letters to debtors

Further things to consider when writing follow-up letters to debtors

Follow-Up Letters

Follow-up letters are letters you write after business contracts, job interviews or business meetings to show that you are still interested in the recipients and that you are willing to build a relationship. Follow-up letters provide a platform for continued communication and are an effective way of consolidating a real relationship between you and the recipients. A follow-up letter is important in the early stages of a business relationship as it gives you an opportunity to reintroduce yourself and reconnect with the recipient. It also gives you a chance to address a concern that was raised at the previous meeting or give additional information to the recipient.

Well written follow-up letters can make a great difference in your success. These are letters sent during the early stage of the relationship, and therefore the writing style should be fairly formal. Make sure to write the letter as soon as possible after the meeting to keep things fresh. Explain your point clearly and avoid making unnecessary assumptions. Try as much as possible not to convey any negative sentiments. Where necessary, remind the recipient of any deadlines as well as date and time for the next meeting. Close the letter positively.

Letters to Debtors

Letters to debtors are letters you write to people or institutions that owe you money. Mostly, these are collection letters to inform the recipients of the defaulted payments or demand letters to warn them about eventual legal actions. These letters are usually sent after unsuccessfully trying to get your payment, and it is time to take a more serious action. If you are running a business and you have clients who haven't paid for merchandise or services, your business could suffer financial uncertainty and difficulties. But then, you want to maintain goodwill and not damage the business' s reputation in the community.

When writing letters to debtors, especially those asking for payment, you need to be professional. Start with a friendly letter and if the failure to pay continues, get progressively more serious. Provide important details about the debt - state how much is owed and when the payment should be made. For subsequent letters, use a firm tone but be considerate and professional so as not to ruin the possibility of future deals with the recipient. Recount any conversations that have happened since the first letter. End with a note of anticipation to having the situation resolved.

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