Follow-up letter on receiving no response

GUIDELINES

  1. Introduce the reason you are writing this letter.
  2. Mention the number of times you have already written to the reader.
  3. Express hope to the reader reverting to you.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I am awaiting your reply to my initial letter dated 25 November 2015.

I have followed up thrice and would earnestly request you to let me know your thoughts on my proposal.

I am sure you will consider this letter and let me know your decision. I will wait to hear from you.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Follow-up letter on receiving no response.

Further things to consider when writing follow-up letters to whom it may concern

Further things to consider when writing follow-up letters to whom it may concern

Follow-Up Letters

Follow-up letters are letters you write after business contracts, job interviews or business meetings to show that you are still interested in the recipients and that you are willing to build a relationship. Follow-up letters provide a platform for continued communication and are an effective way of consolidating a real relationship between you and the recipients. A follow-up letter is important in the early stages of a business relationship as it gives you an opportunity to reintroduce yourself and reconnect with the recipient. It also gives you a chance to address a concern that was raised at the previous meeting or give additional information to the recipient.

Well written follow-up letters can make a great difference in your success. These are letters sent during the early stage of the relationship, and therefore the writing style should be fairly formal. Make sure to write the letter as soon as possible after the meeting to keep things fresh. Explain your point clearly and avoid making unnecessary assumptions. Try as much as possible not to convey any negative sentiments. Where necessary, remind the recipient of any deadlines as well as date and time for the next meeting. Close the letter positively.

Letters to Whom It May Concern

Letters to whom it may concern are letters addressed to unknown recipients. The term "To whom it may concern" is, basically, a letter salutation that has been used over the years in business correspondence when a sender doesn't have a specific recipient or doesn't know the name of the recipient. This may happen many times during your job search. For instance, you may be sending a recommendation letter, cover letter or any other job application material to someone you don't know. It is also appropriate to address a letter to whom it may concern if you're making an inquiry but don't know who to address your letter to.

Although sending letters to whom it may concern has been a common practice, other options such as, "To hiring manager", "To customer service manager", etc., can be used at the start of a letter. Of course, you should make an effort to find the recipient's name. You can look it up on the recipient's company website, LinkedIn or other professional social sites, or contact the office and ask the assistant for advice. However, when this is not possible, you can still use "To whom it may concern".

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