Example of a follow-up letter with promised copy of article

GUIDELINES

  1. Writing letters to talk about speeches or publications of colleagues and subordinates is good. It is an effective way to maintain good relationships with them. This formula also applies to finding new customers and keeping the existing ones happy.
  2. Start by telling the reader which speech or publication prompted you to write this letter.
  3. Write about the parts of speech or article you particularly liked. If you want to meet the reader, mention that too.
  4. End the letter by writing something positive.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

As you have requested, I am sending you a copy of the article I've written entitled "Anxiety Disorders" that has been published in a national paper recently. I am also interested in the research you're currently involved in on psychological trauma. I am hoping that we ca have some time to talk about your research over lunch. I am looking forward to your opinions and comments on my article.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Example of a follow-up letter with promised copy of article.

Further things to consider when writing follow-up letters to colleagues

Further things to consider when writing follow-up letters to colleagues

Follow-Up Letters

Follow-up letters are letters you write after business contracts, job interviews or business meetings to show that you are still interested in the recipients and that you are willing to build a relationship. Follow-up letters provide a platform for continued communication and are an effective way of consolidating a real relationship between you and the recipients. A follow-up letter is important in the early stages of a business relationship as it gives you an opportunity to reintroduce yourself and reconnect with the recipient. It also gives you a chance to address a concern that was raised at the previous meeting or give additional information to the recipient.

Well written follow-up letters can make a great difference in your success. These are letters sent during the early stage of the relationship, and therefore the writing style should be fairly formal. Make sure to write the letter as soon as possible after the meeting to keep things fresh. Explain your point clearly and avoid making unnecessary assumptions. Try as much as possible not to convey any negative sentiments. Where necessary, remind the recipient of any deadlines as well as date and time for the next meeting. Close the letter positively.

Letters to Colleagues

Letters to colleagues are, simply, letters written to coworkers. These letters are written in a business or professional setting for different purposes. Maybe you want to thank a coworker for doing you a favor - write a thank-you letter. You want to congratulate him/her for a promotion - write a congratulation letter. Perhaps you want to apologize for doing something wrong - write an apology letter, or may be you have found a new job, and it's time to say goodbye - write a farewell letter. Although some colleagues may find writing letters a tedious process, it is a great way to maintain a strong working relationship.

Most letters to colleagues are informal. You really don't need to use all that formal jargon to people you know pretty well ? do you? Begin your letter with a warm and friendly salutation and the proper name of the recipient. Clearly state the purpose of your letter. Be specific and know exactly what you are talking about. Use clear language which the recipient can easily understand. Maintain a friendly and pleasant tone. Close the letter positively and with a note of anticipation that the recipient will take the necessary action.

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