Disagreement letter about the extension of a school day

GUIDELINES

  1. State the problem with clarity and do not blame or threaten in the first letter. If the problem is not getting resolved, follow up with consequent letters. In the further proceedings mention the course of action that you have planned. But make sure you have decided to take further action to resolve the problem.
  2. State the exact reason for disagreement.
  3. Provide necessary proof to support your point of view.
  4. Mention the expected result of your plan of action. Include the course of action that you plan to take up.
  5. End the letter by mentioning the advantages of agreement of a solution. Express your confidence in it.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I am writing to tell you I oppose your decision to make up snow days by having the students continue school until June. My family and I have plans to attend my brother's wedding the weekend after school was originally scheduled to be out. If you decide to keep the kids in until June, my children will not be there.

I am not the kind of person who usually complains about these things. In fact, I work in the teacher's workroom each Tuesday afternoon as a volunteer, trying to support the school. However, we have purchased airline tickets and booked a hotel, and there are no refunds. Besides, this is a very special family event.

If you cannot do what neighboring school districts are doing and have the kids attend Saturday school until the time is made up, I want written proof that my children will not be penalized for their absence.

In the future, maybe the school board should add in more snow days. It seems like this happens every year!

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Disagreement letter about the extension of a school day.

Further things to consider when writing disagreement letters to schools

Further things to consider when writing disagreement letters to schools

Disagreement Letters

Disagreement letters are letters written when someone disapproves the opinion of the other person. They allow you to express your frustrations or concerns assertively and constructively. There are many situations that might force you to write a disagreement letter. For instance, an accusation of a company policy violation, poor performance rating, or wrongful discharge. It may also be a local government decision that could affect your property. When these things happen, you may feel defensive and angry, and it is important that you calm down and clear your head before expressing your opinion.

Disagreement letters must be written in a manner that expresses your opinion clearly. Outline the disagreement and briefly explain how you think it can best be resolved. Maintain a professional tone throughout the letter and avoid being rude to the recipient. Keep the letter brief and to the point and avoid adding unnecessary details that might confuse the issue or the recipient. Be constructive and back up your opinions with evidence, pointing out the specific error or concern respectfully. Avoid accusations and threats despite how you feel. End the letter with a positive tone that displays your confidence in resolving the issue.

Letters to Schools

Letters to schools are letters written to institutions designed to provide learning environment and spaces to pupils and students. There are many times when you may feel the need to write to a school administration. Maybe you want to recommend a student or employee or want to apply for an academic program. Perhaps your child has a disability, and you want to make sure that he/she is receiving special education services. Whatever the issue, putting your thoughts in writing avoids confusion since it provides you and the recipient with a record of your request. It is, therefore, crucial to keep a copy of any letter you send.

All letters to schools must use the standard business letter style. Start your letter with the proper address and salutation. Introduce yourself and explain the reason for your letter clearly and concisely. Depending on the content of your letter, provide any documentation that gives the recipient reference to the case or clarifies your concerns. Keep the tone polite, respectful, and professional. Close by thanking the recipient for his/her time and with a note of anticipation of positive feedback. Sign off and proofread the final draft before sending it.

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