Decline an invitation to join an organization. Sample letter

GUIDELINES

  1. The organization's members certainly believe that they are offering you an important product or service. Thus, you should express gratitude and that you appreciate the opportunity they have given you. Tell them you cannot accept their offer this time and show respect for the organization.
  2. Tell him or her that you appreciate his or her invitation and send your regards to the organization. Shortly give an explanation on why you cannot attend.
  3. Relay your good wishes for the organization's success and mention interest of possible affiliation in the future.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I would like to express my appreciation at being invited to join the Winston Community Association. I am honored by the invitation as I hold your Association in great respect for the excellent works you have achieved in our community. Unfortunately, at this time, I must decline your invitation. I was recently appointed Publicity Officer for the Winston Workers Union and have not only a commitment on Monday evenings but a considerable workload as part of this appointment.

When my tenure is complete with the WWU, should your offer still stand, I would be willing to reconsider. Thank you for your consideration and good luck with your upcoming events and initiatives.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Decline an invitation to join an organization. Sample letter.

Further things to consider when writing rejection letters to organizations

Further things to consider when writing rejection letters to organizations

Rejection Letters

Rejection letters are letters written to inform people that something they have made, written, etc., has been turned down. These letters can be used, for instance, to inform people that they have not been chosen for a job or school enrollment or that a book they have written has not been chosen for publishing. Conveying rejection can be difficult because most people don't know how to say the words without hurting the recipient. Actually, in most cases, people don't write rejection letters at all. They just drop communication with the concerned person, (which is rude). Rejection letters are important because they help build trust and develop goodwill between the parties involved.

After rejection, the people affected will be frustrated no matter what. However, well-drafted rejection letters can soften the blow and encourage them to keep trying. An excellent rejection letter is brief, considerate, and to the point. Begin by thanking the recipient for trying. State your decision politely and assertively, giving reasons for it. If you are rejecting a job application, for instance, give a genuine reason for it and encourage the recipient to apply for other positions. End on a positive note and wish the recipient success.

Letters to Organizations

Letters to organizations are letters written to institutions, associations, or any organized body of people working together to achieve a common goal. An organization could be a charity, union, corporation, or even a neighborhood association. There are a thousand reasons why you may want to write to an organization. Maybe you want to volunteer to offer your services, or you want to make a donation. Perhaps you are requesting sponsorship for your event. Whatever the reason, any letter to an organization must be formal and addressed properly.

When writing letters to organizations, it's important to know what it is that you want to achieve and what you want the organization to do. Use the standard business letter format. Start your letter with a proper salutation and introduce yourself or your company. State the purpose of the letter. Mention what you are asking for or what you are offering. Include any materials or information that you feel might be important to the recipient. Use a polite and professional tone. Keep the letter short, preferably, one page. In the end, thank the recipient in advance for his/her time and consideration. Sign-off using business-appropriate language. Include your full name and contact details.

These articles may interest you

These articles may interest you