Transmits a bid, proposal, or quotation. Sample letter

GUIDELINES

  1. If you get an invitation or a request to make a bid or proposal, you will send a quote, proposal or bid. You will identify the contents of the package you sent in this letter. That's how the reader will know what to do with it.
  2. You should give the details of the context for your bid by specifying the invitation or request to which you are responding. Give the reason for sending the document.
  3. Tell the reader what kind of material you have sent. Briefly, sketch an outline of the contents of this document.
  4. Discuss the important issues and questions about limitations, deadlines, or design flaws. Explain the advantages of your proposal to win this contract.
  5. Request a response within a particular time. Tell the reader what do you expect him/her to do about your suggestion. If it seems appropriate, ask him/her to acknowledge your quote.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

Amber Incorporated is more than happy to submit our proposal and bid for the project you advertised last week. We have attached a document that details the specifics of our proposal, which we feel you will find favorable regarding what you need.

Our company is dedicated to the production of the highest quality of products and giving the best service possible to our clients.

We would like to extend our sincerest gratitude for giving us the opportunity to show what we can do for you. We hope to meet with you soon. Thank you.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Transmits a bid, proposal, or quotation. Sample letter.

Further things to consider when writing transmittal letters to clients

Further things to consider when writing transmittal letters to clients

Transmittal Letters

Transmittal letters are letters written to accompany important documents such as financial reports, proposals, security certificates, or any other sensitive information. Such letters are usually sent by businesses, organizations, or individuals to provide information about the corresponding documents. Generally speaking, a transmittal letter explains the document, why it should receive the recipient's consideration, and what he/she should do with it. The recipient reads the transmittal letter to identify the context in which he/she should view the document. Sometimes, cover letters that accompany job applications and resumes are also called transmittal letters.

The main purpose of transmittal letters is to introduce other documents. Therefore, they need to be as neat and clear as possible. State the document name. Give a brief content description and the reason for sending. Include actions the recipient should take like notifying the sender of the document's receipt or forwarding it to another person. Include important deadlines and dates that the recipient should be made aware of. Highlight the major points or sections of the document. Be brief and do not let the letter exceed one page. End with your contact information, statement of thanks, and offers of assistance. Print the letter on the company's letterhead.

Letters to Clients

Letters to clients are letters a person or organization writes to other people and/or organizations that benefit from the senders' products or professional services. These could be welcome letters to welcome the clients to the organization, introduction letters to introduce a product or service to the clients, or thank-you letters to appreciate clients for their continued support. They could also be response letters to respond to clients' queries or inform letters to notify the clients of important matters like discounts on products and services, relocation of offices, etc. Basically, a letter to a client can be just about anything, as long as whatever you are communicating is business-related.

Letters to clients are business letters, and therefore, they should be formal and professional. Start the letter with a proper salutation. Clearly state the purpose of your letter. If a client is required to take a certain urgent action, make sure to specify exactly what he/she is supposed to do. Be brief and straightforward and avoid adding irrelevant details. Close the letter by warmly inviting the recipient to respond or to take the necessary action. Sign the letter and provide your contact details. Print the letter on the company's letterhead.

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