Example of letter to client who sent the wrong check

GUIDELINES

  1. This short yet descriptive letter can provide you an opportunity to appreciate your client for his or her business.
  2. Tell the customer you are grateful for his or her check or correspondence.
  3. Explain to the customer the problem he or she made.
  4. Request the client to correct his or her mistake.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

We received a check from you through the mail this morning. However, we feel that you may have sent us the wrong one, as it was written out to a different company and didn't have the correct amount of your bill. We have enclosed the said check and would appreciate it if you could send us another to cover your balance as soon as possible.

Thank you for your business.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Example of letter to client who sent the wrong check.

Further things to consider when writing inform letters to clients

Further things to consider when writing inform letters to clients

Inform Letters

Inform letters are letters written to communicate new knowledge or changes in situations. Whether you want to keep your employees updated with recent changes in the work routine or structure of the company, or to communicate interview dates to job applicants, an inform letter will be the best formal way to do it. Inform letters can also be used to inform employees about new policies that may affect the employment's terms and conditions as agreed to in the contract. For instance, if workdays and business hours are planned during a holiday, an employee should send inform letters to communicate the new schedule and ask employees to solicit cooperation.

Keeping your employees well informed is important to your business and inform letters are powerful tools to do just that. Mention the reason for writing early in the letter. Be thorough, concise, and omit irrelevant details. For unpleasant news like a layoff, be direct yet sensitive. Give clear and complete information to avoid being bombarded with questions later. Communicate exactly what you want the recipient to do. End the letter on a positive note and send it early enough so that the reader has enough time to prepare for the assignment.

Letters to Clients

Letters to clients are letters a person or organization writes to other people and/or organizations that benefit from the senders' products or professional services. These could be welcome letters to welcome the clients to the organization, introduction letters to introduce a product or service to the clients, or thank-you letters to appreciate clients for their continued support. They could also be response letters to respond to clients' queries or inform letters to notify the clients of important matters like discounts on products and services, relocation of offices, etc. Basically, a letter to a client can be just about anything, as long as whatever you are communicating is business-related.

Letters to clients are business letters, and therefore, they should be formal and professional. Start the letter with a proper salutation. Clearly state the purpose of your letter. If a client is required to take a certain urgent action, make sure to specify exactly what he/she is supposed to do. Be brief and straightforward and avoid adding irrelevant details. Close the letter by warmly inviting the recipient to respond or to take the necessary action. Sign the letter and provide your contact details. Print the letter on the company's letterhead.

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