Letter requesting an informational interview


  1. Let the reader know the reason you are writing the letter.
  2. Elaborate the information you would require and if any supporting documents or proofs are required.
  3. End with a note of further action. Thank the reader.


[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-

Dear [Recipients Name],

Please treat this as an invitation to an interview scheduled on the 25th of March. It will be an informational interview.

You will need to bring along all supporting documents to validate any information given at the meeting.

Hope to see you at my office on the date mentioned above. Thank you.


[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter requesting an informational interview.

Further things to consider when writing inform letters to human resources

Further things to consider when writing inform letters to human resources

Inform Letters

Inform letters are letters written to communicate new knowledge or changes in situations. Whether you want to keep your employees updated with recent changes in the work routine or structure of the company, or to communicate interview dates to job applicants, an inform letter will be the best formal way to do it. Inform letters can also be used to inform employees about new policies that may affect the employment's terms and conditions as agreed to in the contract. For instance, if workdays and business hours are planned during a holiday, an employee should send inform letters to communicate the new schedule and ask employees to solicit cooperation.

Keeping your employees well informed is important to your business and inform letters are powerful tools to do just that. Mention the reason for writing early in the letter. Be thorough, concise, and omit irrelevant details. For unpleasant news like a layoff, be direct yet sensitive. Give clear and complete information to avoid being bombarded with questions later. Communicate exactly what you want the recipient to do. End the letter on a positive note and send it early enough so that the reader has enough time to prepare for the assignment.

Letters to Human Resources

Letters to human resources are letters written to the personnel or department that deals with administration, training, and hiring of employees in an organization. The role of human resources personnel is to handle everything from payroll to policy issues and legal grievances. If you have a policy or legal question, a personal issue that affects your work, or a serious problem with a colleague, the first person you may want to contact is a human resources representative. The best way to begin this conversation is by drafting a letter stating your specific problem.

When writing letters to human resources, make sure to follow all the rules of a formal letter. Start by addressing your letter to the right person. Write a clear subject line communicating your problem and indicating that action is needed. Set a formal and professional tone early in the conversation. Keep your sentences short and clear and avoid providing more information than is necessary. Describe the issue precisely giving a timeline of when it started. Explain what you have done or think can be done to address the issue. Request for an in-person meeting. Close on a note of anticipation to seeing the issue resolved.

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