Letter of confirmation of residence

GUIDELINES

  1. Announce that your home address has changed and confirm the new address.
  2. Mention all future correspondences have to be sent to this address.
  3. List any additional documents that are attached to verify the address.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

This letter is to inform you that we, [last name] have changed our residence. Please treat this letter as a confirmation of my new address. The new address is [state new address].

Please send all postal mails and consignments to this address.

Find attached a photocopy of the electricity bill in my name and the corresponding address. Please use this address for all future communications.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter of confirmation of residence.

Further things to consider when writing confirmation letters to whom it may concern

Further things to consider when writing confirmation letters to whom it may concern

Confirmation Letters

Confirmation letters are letters sent by individuals, businesses, or companies to summarize details such as verbal agreements between two parties, job interviews, or appointments. Broadly speaking, they are written to verify certain details upon request or recognize previous agreements. A confirmation letter can serve as a formal document to confirm the receipt of orders, schedule of an important appointment, or recruitment of new employees. It can also be used to confirm travel arrangements and reservations and in instances such as immigration to confirm marital status. Confirmation letters are mostly used by businesses to keep formal records and to avoid conflicts regarding transactions or agreements.

Confirmation letters are brief and contain only the necessary information. State what is being confirmed clearly and accurately. If you are verifying an employee's position in the company, for example, take note of his/her official title. Be cautious about times, dates, and places. Include all relevant details and anything else that needs to be confirmed. If necessary, restate the previously agreed terms and conditions to ensure that there are no conflicts or misunderstandings in the future. Close the letter with a positive remark and your signature. This letter should be printed on the company's letterhead.

Letters to Whom It May Concern

Letters to whom it may concern are letters addressed to unknown recipients. The term "To whom it may concern" is, basically, a letter salutation that has been used over the years in business correspondence when a sender doesn't have a specific recipient or doesn't know the name of the recipient. This may happen many times during your job search. For instance, you may be sending a recommendation letter, cover letter or any other job application material to someone you don't know. It is also appropriate to address a letter to whom it may concern if you're making an inquiry but don't know who to address your letter to.

Although sending letters to whom it may concern has been a common practice, other options such as, "To hiring manager", "To customer service manager", etc., can be used at the start of a letter. Of course, you should make an effort to find the recipient's name. You can look it up on the recipient's company website, LinkedIn or other professional social sites, or contact the office and ask the assistant for advice. However, when this is not possible, you can still use "To whom it may concern".

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