Debt collection dispute letter. Sample letter

GUIDELINES

  1. Explicitly state that you disagree with the amount being billed to you.
  2. Put in the reasons why you are disagreeing with the amount being billed.
  3. Possibly request for a reevaluation of the debt owed and ask for the necessary documents to prove the debt.
  4. End on a courteous tone.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I am writing to you to inform you that I am making a dispute against the bill that you sent me last week, stating that I have an overdue balance of $ 40,000.

I have not incurred any such bill at any point with you, and I ask you to double check your records to see if the bill you sent me was correct or not. If you find that your files still show that I hold that debt, I wish to receive a copy of it so that I may have a look for myself.

I look forward to hearing from you about this matter soon.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Debt collection dispute letter. Sample letter.

Further things to consider when writing collection letters to creditors

Further things to consider when writing collection letters to creditors

Collection Letters

Collection letters are written notifications or official messages sent by a creditor, business owner, or company to customers to inform them of a past due balance. Collection letters usually notify the customers of money owed including instructions of how to make a late payment. They may also include warnings for potential penalties due to late payments or non-payments and notifications for possible legal actions in the event the recipient fails to settle his/her account. Collection letters have been used in instances such as reminding students of overdue tuition fee, requesting customers to pay their credit card bills, demanding payment for a sent parcel, and much more.

Collection letters are usually written in a series. The first letter is just a simple reminder and the tone changes to a more direct and demanding one with successive letters. Constantly remind the customer that your payment is due or past due and request him/her to pay you immediately. Use a polite tone to avoid hurting your relationship with the customer. Include the amount of debt the customer must pay and indicate the next deadline. Mention the consequences of late payment and close the letter on a positive note.

Letters to Creditors

Letters to creditors are letters written to people or companies to whom money is owed. A creditor can be a bank, person, or any financial institution. If you have got some debts, you will definitely find yourself writing letters to creditors at some point. They could be inquiry letters to request information about your debts, cancellation letters to cancel credit agreements, or inform letters to inform the creditors of changes in the payment methods. Letters are a great and powerful tool to use when communicating with your creditors. They can help you to handle tough issues and protect your rights.

When writing letters to creditors, you need to make sure that you have all the required information. Address the letter to the appropriate person and use the right salutation. State clearly why you are writing the letter. Provide important details such as your contact and account information - you can reference this information before the body of the letter. If you had called the recipient regarding the issue, mention that in the letter. Mention other documents enclosed with the letter if any. Be brief and maintain a professional tone. Finish with your full name and signature.

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