Sample letter delegating a task to someone

GUIDELINES

  1. Mention how you would expect the task has to be done by the reader. Explain in detail how to perform the task.
  2. Mention the details of how exactly you want the job to be done.
  3. Include a deadline you would expect the task to complete in. You could also arrange a follow-up or assess the task whenever required.
  4. You could probably say you are ready to assist with clearing any doubts.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

Our company has been asked to participate in the state's annual Expo event next month. The management committee, including myself, has chosen you as the Head Sales Representative, who will be planning and coordinating all activities for the said affair. The first step you need to do is to choose three other employees that will make up your team. Other responsibilities include the overall design of our booth, the creation of advertising and promotional materials, and cooperation with the organizers of the Expo. Also, please keep me continuously updated on your progress. I trust in your capabilities and wish you the best of luck. We are rooting for your success. Don't hesitate to approach me if you have any questions or issues you would like to discuss.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Sample letter delegating a task to someone.

Further things to consider when writing directive letters to team members

Further things to consider when writing directive letters to team members

Directive Letters

Directive letters are letters written to give official or authoritative instructions. These letters allow individuals or companies to carry out tasks in an efficient way. There are countless scenarios that may require one to write a directive letter. The most common ones include giving directions on how to carry out a task and introducing or reaffirming new procedures at work. It can also be written to a bank to authorize a transfer.

Directive letters should be drafted carefully keeping in mind every instruction that the recipient is required to follow. These are formal letters, and therefore the tone must be professional. Clearly state what needs to be done and provide as much information as possible regarding the situation. If it is a problem that needs to be resolved, indicate what the problem is as well as suggestions on how to resolve it. If necessary, mention the reason for the directive and its benefits to the recipient. Give a deadline for which you expect the task to have been completed. You might also include the names of individuals the recipient can contact or the resources that might help him/her complete the assignment. End with a note of appreciation.

Letters to Team Members

Letters to team members are letters sent to people belonging to a specific group involved in striving to achieve a common goal. These could be appreciation letters to show gratitude and acknowledgment for the efforts of team members or motivation letters to offer encouragement. Communicating with the people who helped you achieve your goals is one of the most effective ways to strengthen your network and your work relationships. Everyone loves to be appreciated for his/her efforts and encouraged when the going gets tough. The best way to do this is to draft a letter to communicate your feelings.

Letters to team members can be informal as these are people whom you know pretty well. Begin by stating the objective of your letter. Go directly to the point and deliver your message. If you are writing to appreciate the team members' for outstanding performance, recognize the skills they used to achieve that performance. If the letter is meant to give motivation to the team, offer your encouragement assertively and in a sensitive tone. Avoid making negative comments directed to members who seem to be lagging behind. End the letter with a positive remark or a statement of encouragement.

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