Letter to respond to a job offer, negotiating conditions

GUIDELINES

  1. If you receive a job offer, you should be sure that the conditions you negotiated are right for you. You should be able to jeopardize the offer instead of accepting it as it is. Your tone should be positive and respectful. It is necessary to make sure that the reader knows that you are interested in this offer.
  2. Thank the reader for his/her job offer.
  3. Point out the terms you want to change and how you want to modify them.
  4. If it suits the situation, mention the conditions you are willing to accept.
  5. Tell the reader how you will contact him/her the next time.
  6. Show your interest in the job again. End positively by expressing confidence in your abilities to contribute to the company.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I was very pleased to receive your response regarding my job application. Thank you very much for trusting me to do the job. I am certainly looking forward to working for XYZ Inc.

Before we proceed with the next steps, however, I would just like to clarify something. During our initial discussions, we agreed that I would be handling two small teams. However, this is not mentioned in the job description I received yesterday. Since one of the reasons I was so eager to take on this responsibility is the opportunity to hone my leadership skills, I am anxious to know if I will still be given the same tasks as initially agreed on. Please feel free to contact me as soon as possible so that we can discuss this. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Letter to respond to a job offer, negotiating conditions.

Further things to consider when writing cover letters to human resources

Further things to consider when writing cover letters to human resources

Cover Letters

Cover letters are letters written to explain the contents of other documents. In most cases, cover letters are sent together with resumes to provide additional information on the applicant's' skills and experience. They explain in detail why the applicants are qualified for the job they are applying for. A cover letter creates a critical first impression as it is often the earliest contact you will have with a potential employer. Employees use cover letters to screen applicants for available positions and to determine the ones that they would like to interview.

Cover letters are an essential part of every job application. You, therefore, need to make sure that your cover letter sells your abilities and skills to recruiters. Do not just repeat what is on your resume, rather, explain in details why you feel that you are the best match for the applied job. Do this clearly and concisely, and in such a way that the recipient would want to meet you. Mention the employment position that you are applying for, how you learnt about it and how you are qualified for it. Request the recipient to contact you at the end of the letter.

Letters to Human Resources

Letters to human resources are letters written to the personnel or department that deals with administration, training, and hiring of employees in an organization. The role of human resources personnel is to handle everything from payroll to policy issues and legal grievances. If you have a policy or legal question, a personal issue that affects your work, or a serious problem with a colleague, the first person you may want to contact is a human resources representative. The best way to begin this conversation is by drafting a letter stating your specific problem.

When writing letters to human resources, make sure to follow all the rules of a formal letter. Start by addressing your letter to the right person. Write a clear subject line communicating your problem and indicating that action is needed. Set a formal and professional tone early in the conversation. Keep your sentences short and clear and avoid providing more information than is necessary. Describe the issue precisely giving a timeline of when it started. Explain what you have done or think can be done to address the issue. Request for an in-person meeting. Close on a note of anticipation to seeing the issue resolved.

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