Persuasion letter for public's support on taxi fare issue

GUIDELINES

  1. If you wish to get the reader's attention through a persuasive memo, you must keep his/her feelings in mind. Think how the reader will react to what you say and how can you convince him/her. You should carefully decide that how much emotional appeal will be suitable and to what extent you should use logical arguments.
  2. Highlight the issue in the beginning.
  3. State what action you expect from the reader.
  4. Give reasons about why the reader should follow your suggestion. State what the reader will gain from cooperating with you.
  5. Give a call to action and provide more information.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

The officers of the Land Transportation Franchise and Regulatory Board and the representatives from the City Drivers' Association will come to an end soon. Unfortunately, the series of meetings has not yet yielded positive results. The debate about the fixed add-on for the taxi fare is still left hanging.

With every intention of resolving the issue as soon as possible, Jules Smith, a representative from the drivers' Association, has pushed for an emergency meeting this coming Saturday at 4:00 p.m.

The rest of the member states have already expressed their awareness of the fact that we, the drivers, as well as the transportation operators, rely on agreeable terms to uphold the stability of our business. We are also hoping that the public could be involved in the resolution of this issue by placing your support on what we are lobbying.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Persuasion letter for public's support on taxi fare issue.

Further things to consider when writing persuasive letters to citizens, neighbors

Further things to consider when writing persuasive letters to citizens, neighbors

Persuasive Letters

Persuasive letters are letters written to persuade others towards accepting the senders' issues, perspectives, or interests. Such letters are meant to influence the recipients' thoughts and actions. The recipient can be organizations such as banks, schools, and NGOs, or individuals such as CEOs, government officials, directors, etc. Whether you want to solve a problem with your bank or you want someone to help you or do something for you, Persuasive letters can get the job done. All you need to do it to convince the recipient to agree with your side of the story.

Before writing persuasive letters you need to brainstorm what you want, why you want it, and any arguments against you. Be brief and use clear, uncluttered sentences. State your main points in the opening statements. Go straight to the point and emphasize the importance of your request. Support your request with logical information. If necessary, provide a few testimonials that relate to your argument. Be friendly, polite, and factual, and refrain from using overly emotional language and judgmental statements. Agree to meet in the middle or compromise. End the letter with a powerful statement that persuades the recipient to be on your side.

Letters to Citizens, Neighbors

Letters to citizens and neighbors are letters written to residents or natives of a certain town or city or to people who reside near or next door to the sender. These letters could be formal or informal depending on the sender and the content. For instance, a local government official may write an inform letter to notify citizens of a major security alert in their area of residence. In this case, this will be a formal letter. In other instances, a person may write to invite his/her neighbors to a house party, to offer condolences, to say thank you, or even to apologize. In such situations, the letters are informal and usually have a casual tone.

The best letters to citizens and neighbors are brief and carry only the intended message. State the purpose of your letter clearly in the introductory paragraph so that the recipient can have an idea of what the letter is about. Convey your message and provide any other information you feel might be important to the recipient. End the letter positively and thank the recipient for his/her time, wishing him/her well. If your letter is formal, your full name and signature will be required.

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