GUIDELINES

  1. Begin by acknowledging the letter for the foreclosure.
  2. Respond to each of the claim made by the lender. Each claim should be in a numbered paragraph format and should be admitted, denied or stated as insufficient information.
  3. If appropriate, provide an explanation about why the plaintiff could not file this suit in the first place
  4. End with a positive statement of hope.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

I have received the letter for the foreclosure summons.

Below are my replies to the claims made by the plaintiff. 1. I accept allegation made in paragraph one and two.2. I deny allegations made in paragraph 3 and 4

I would also like you to take note; the loan amount has increased by 30% due to the inappropriate fee structure raised by the plaintiff, without any prior notice.

I am confident that you will look at both sides of the suit and will resolve this issue at the earliest.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Response letter to a foreclosure summons #2.

Further things to consider when writing response letters to banks

Response Letters

Response letters are letters written to provide answers or information requested in letters of inquiry. The main purpose of such letters is to satisfy the recipient with an action that fulfills his/her request. A response letter can be used to respond to a query about company's products and services or just to respond to a complaint. It makes the recipient feel valued and helps maintain strong relationships between the parties involved. A response letter also gives you an opportunity to clear up any misunderstandings with the recipient or ask questions. Response letters should be sent promptly, and all issues must be addressed courteously (even those that seem irrelevant).

When writing response letters, it is advisable to keep the message short and to the point, taking into account that the recipient may lack your expertise. Make sure to address the letter to the person who made the inquiry and mention that this is a response to that inquiry. Maintain a positive tone even if the letter contains negative information. Make your response as clear as possible. If you are responding to multiple questions, for instance, consider putting your answers in bullet form. Close by offering to give further assistance.

Letters to Banks

Letters to banks are letters sent specifically to the banks by their customers. The letters can be addressed to bank managers or any other relevant bank official, based on the situation at hand. There are various reasons why you may want to write a letter to the bank. The most common ones include to request for a new ATM card, to ask for funds transfer from one account to another, or to open or close an account. You can also write to inform the bank about a phone number or postal address change. In all these situations, letters to the bank must remain formal and professional.

Before writing letters to banks, you need to make sure that you have all the information the bank may need regarding your account. Use the standard business greetings. If you know the recipient's name, write to him/her by name. Mention the purpose of the letter. Provide all the necessary information such as account number, name, postal and email address, contact number, etc. as registered with the bank. Be specific and avoid writing the same thing twice. Keep the letter simple and concise. Wrap the letter up by calling the recipient to appropriate action.

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