GUIDELINES

  1. If you intend to use other people's published or unpublished works in writing another paper, you must ask permission from the copyright holder. To make it easier for the person to reply to your inquiry, you must take into consideration the following: 1. You may opt to add a form for the person to sign and send back, or either send a duplicate letter with an approval space provided) so the reader can hold one copy and send back the other. 2. Also, add a self-address stamped envelope.
  2. Concisely explain the details of your project and tell the copyright owner why you need to use some parts of his or her material.
  3. Provide the exact particulars of the materials you will use, especially the page numbers, lines or paragraphs, title, labels or first and last sentences of the content.
  4. Describe how you see your work to be published or used.
  5. Exactly discuss what the credit or permission line will be written, so he or she can approve or make other instructions.
  6. Express your gratitude, and if possible, give him or her a copy of your finished material.

SAMPLE LETTER

[Senders Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Letter Date]

[Recipients Name]
[Address line]
[State, ZIP Code]

[Subject: Normally bold, summarizes the intention of the letter] -Optional-


Dear [Recipients Name],

The Roebuck Today is compiling articles for a special issue of the environment which is going to be published next month. We reviewed related articles in our past publications, and we noticed one your articles with the title: "Dye Factory: Good or Bad?" May we republish some parts of your article?

The point of interest in your article is on the harm caused by dye factories to our lakes and rivers. The portion begins, "The economic and employment benefits of dye plants..." and ends with the words, "The environmental harm of dye factories far outweighs the economic benefits that they bring to the community."

Since you are a staunch supporter of environmental preservation, we know that our May's issue of environmental awareness will interest you; more so that it will feature advice columns on how we can preserve Roebuck's natural beauty. We will acknowledge your article in this way: "Excerpts from James Dell's 'Dye Factory: Good or Bad?"' If you are pleased with this idea, kindly send us a permission statement.

Sincerely,

[Senders Name]
[Senders Title] -Optional-

[Enclosures: number] - Optional -
cc: [Name of copy recipient] - Optional -

Sample request letter to quote part of an article.

Further things to consider when writing request letters to authors

Request Letters

Request letters are letters written to ask formally or politely for something. Any matter that requires a humble and polite appeal can be put forward using a request letter. It could be a job interview, a promotion, or a favor; a request letter will get the job done. A request letter can be formal or informal depending on the recipient. If you are requesting a friend to do a task for you, for instance, you can choose to go informal. But if you are requesting your manager for a promotion, the letter has to be formal. Either way, a request letter must be sent early enough to give the recipient ample time to process and respond to the request.

When writing request letters, you need to be brief and direct, avoiding any auxiliary information that might weaken the message you are conveying. State exactly and clearly what you are requesting for giving reasons for it. If you are requesting for a raise, for example, explain in details why you think you deserve one. Maintain a polite tone throughout the letter. Close the letter by thanking the recipient in advance and expressing your anticipation for his/her consideration.

Letters to Authors

Letters to authors are letters written to writers of books, reports, or articles. Such letters are used to express appreciation of the authors' work and to motivate them to produce even better pieces. In rare cases, letters to authors may be used to point out mistakes in their work. A letter to the author can be of great help to the recipient in that it could help him/her know whether his/her piece is reaching the intended audience. It could also be a great opportunity for the author to learn and understand what he/she needs to do to produce a masterpiece.

Letters to authors can be formal or informal depending on the relationship you share with the recipient. If the recipient is a person you have never met, for example, use a professional and formal tone. On the other hand, if you know your recipient on a personal level, you may choose to go casual. Regardless, your letter should be brief and should only carry the intended message. Keep it classy and avoid making mean comments. Be specific and know exactly what you are talking about. If you feel that the recipient needs to improve, offer improvement suggestions. Close positively.

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